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How to Pay
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Your options to pay for long-term care vary by the type of setting and may include private pay, Medicaid, Medicare, veterans benefits, and other programs. Eligibility requirements may apply for some benefits.

Payment options by care setting

Nursing Homes

  • Private Pay - Costs for long term care vary according to the location and type of facility and services offered. Statewide, the average cost of a nursing home is more than $5,000 per month.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services's National Clearinghouse for Long-term Care has a wealth of information about costs of long term care by state.
  • Medicaid - Medicaid is a joint federal-state medical assistance program for low-income individuals and can pay for long-term care if a person has the required level of care need. Please see Ohio Medicaid's consumer publication for information about eligibility and services. Your Area Agency on Aging can discuss the eligibility requirements for Medicaid and can help you apply.
  • Medicare Part A - Medicare Part A is hospital insurance and covers hospitalization, hospice care, and some skilled nursing and home health care. Part A also helps pay for durable medical equipment, such as a hospital bed or wheelchair.
  • Medicare Part B - Medicare Part B covers two types of services: medically necessary services or supplies that are needed to diagnose or treat your medical condition and preventive services to prevent illness or detect it at an early stage. 
  • MyCare Ohio - MyCare Ohio provides coordinated care for Ohioans who are eligible for Medicaid and Medicare, including people with disabilities, older adults, and individuals who receive behavioral health services. MyCare Ohio can pay for long-term care services provided in nursing or assisted living facilities or in the home (via services such as home-delivered meals, medical transportation, and help with personal care).
  • Long-Term Care Insurance - Whether or not long-term care insurance is right for you can be a difficult decision. Please review the Guide to Long-Term Care Insurance published by the Ohio Department of Insurance.
  • Veterans - As a veteran, you may be eligible for long-term care support through the Veteran’s Administration. Please contact Ohio Department of Veterans Services for help in navigating veterans’ benefits. Many nursing homes contract with the Veteran’s Administration to provide long-term care to veterans and there are two dedicated state veterans homes in Ohio.

Residential Care Facilities (Assisted Living)

  • MyCare Ohio provides coordinated care for Ohioans who are eligible for Medicaid and Medicare, including people with disabilities, older adults, and individuals who receive behavioral health services. MyCare Ohio can pay for long-term care services provided in nursing or assisted living facilities or in the home (via services such as home-delivered meals, medical transportation, and help with personal care).
  • Private Pay - Costs for long term care vary according to the location and type of facility and services offered. Statewide, the cost for a residential care facility can range between $3,000 and $6,000 per month.
  • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's National Clearinghouse for Long-term Care has a wealth of information about costs of long term care by state.
  • Ohio's Assisted Living Waiver Program - Ohio's Assisted Living Waiver Program pays the costs of care in an assisted living facility for certain people with Medicaid, allowing the consumer to use his or her resources to cover "room and board" expenses. Individuals who meet certain service and care needs and meet established financial criteria may be eligible for Ohio's Assisted Living Waiver Program. To find out if you are eligible, please contact your contact your area agency on aging.
  • Medicare Part B - Medicare Part B covers two types of services: medically necessary services or supplies that are needed to diagnose or treat your medical condition and preventive services to prevent illness or detect it at an early stage. 
  • Long-Term Care Insurance - Whether or not Long-Term Care Insurance is right for you can be a difficult decision.  Please review the Guide to Long-Term Care Insurance published by the Ohio Department of Insurance.
  • Veterans - As a veteran, you may be eligible for long-term care support through the Veteran’s Administration. Please contact Ohio Department of Veterans Services for help in navigating veterans’ benefits.

Residential Facilities Class 2 (Adult Group Homes)

  • Your community Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Board - Your local Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Board may be able to help guide you.
  • Local Metropolitan Housing Authority - If you or your loved one is able to live independently, but does not earn enough to cover the rent, you may want to contact your local Metropolitan Housing Authority to apply for a public housing voucher.
  • Private Pay - Costs for care vary according to the location and type of facility and services offered.  Please contact the housing provider for details about payment options and admission requirements.
  • Residential State Supplement - This program provides money to adults with low incomes who are over age 18 or have a disability, but who do not require nursing home care. Participants use the supplement, along with their income, to pay for approved living arrangements.
  • Veteran’s Administration – Veterans may be eligible for support through the Veteran’s Administration. Contact the Ohio Department of Veterans Services for help in navigating veterans’ benefits.

Home- and Community-Based Services

  • Private Pay - Costs for home-based care vary according to the services offered. In 2019 in Ohio, a home health aide received an average monthly rate of $4,385 and homemaker services cost an average of $4,290 a month, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Clearinghouse for Long-term Care. Based on these figures, in 2019 you would have paid more than $51,480 a year on average for a home health aide to assist you.
  • Medicare - Most Americans older than 65 are eligible for the federal Medicare program. If an individual is homebound, under a physician's care, and requires medically necessary skilled nursing or therapy services, he or she may be eligible for services provided by a Medicare-certified home health agency. Depending on the patient's condition, Medicare may pay for intermittent skilled nursing; physical, occupational, and speech therapies; medical social work; and medical equipment and supplies. The referring physician must authorize and periodically review the patient's plan of care. With the exception of hospice care, the services the patient receives must be intermittent or part time and provided through a Medicare-certified home health agency for reimbursement.
  • Medicare Part B - Medicare Part B covers two types of services: medically necessary services or supplies that are needed to diagnose or treat your medical condition and preventive services to prevent illness or detect it at an early stage. 
  • Medicaid - Medicaid is a joint federal-state medical assistance program for low-income individuals. Under federal Medicaid rules, coverage of home health services must include part-time nursing, HCA services, and medical supplies and equipment. Your area agency on aging can discuss the eligibility requirements for Medicaid and can help you apply.
  • MyCare Ohio provides coordinated care for Ohioans who are eligible for Medicaid and Medicare, including people with disabilities, older adults, and individuals who receive behavioral health services. MyCare Ohio can pay for long-term care services provided in nursing or assisted living facilities or in the home (via services such as home-delivered meals, medical transportation, and help with personal care).
  • Veterans Administration - The Veterans Administration (VA) provides home health care coverage to veterans who are at least 50 percent disabled due to a service-related condition. A physician must authorize these services, which must be delivered through the VA's network of hospital-based home care units.
  • The Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) - CHAMPVA is a comprehensive health care program in which the VA shares the cost of covered health care services and supplies with eligible beneficiaries. The program is administered by Health Administration Center.
  • Tricare - Formerly known as the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS): Tricare is a health care program of the United States Department of Defense Military Health System. It provides civilian health benefits, on a cost-shared basis, and covers skilled nursing care and other professional medical home care services for dependents of active military personnel and military retirees and their dependents and survivors.